Mercedes- Benz Marco Polo Campervan

Image of Mercedes LogoMercedes-Benz has revealed their new campervan named the Mercedes-Benz Marco Polo which rivals the Volkswagen California. The campervan was first seen at the Caravan Salon in Dusseldorf. Westfalia helped with the design process and it is based on the V-Class with a kitchen, seats, beds, wardrobe and a retractable table. With space for up to four beds and a classic, sophisticated design with maximum space available, the Marco Polo is great for any kind of trip. We have previously written about campervan holidays in America and once this Mercedes is released it would be the perfect vehicle to do this in.

With the use of light and dark greys, beiges and browns, the interior of the Marco Polo looks very sophisticated. You also get the choice of a dark or light floor and a range of seat trim colours. The only lighting used inside the campervan is LED but you can get ambient lighting for the kitchenette.

In regards to cooking and eating, the campervan features two hobs, a sink, a worktop that extends out, a refrigerator and draws that close without having to touch them. In between the back and front driver seats is a folding table which is scratch-resistant and the front seats rotate 180 degrees so you can all enjoy your meal together!

The rear seats of the campervan can fold down at the touch of a button, creating a comfortable cushioned double bed. A double bed can also be found within the pop-up roof and can be placed inside a net to prevent the chance of children falling off the edge.

The campervan boasts tinted glass at the rear which will prevent any sunlight entering when getting your beauty sleep. Curtains can also be pulled over the windscreen and other windows to black the campervan out completely. The campervan gives a complete travelling experience including an outside, portable table and chairs set which are kept in the luggage compartment within a bag.

With suspension for comfort the Marco Polo is a smooth, easy drive with a 1.98 high roofline meaning you should have no trouble getting into car parks, garages or under low level bridges.

Along with the safety nets for the beds, the campervan has many other features to keep everyone safe. As with most other new cars these days the Marco Polo comes with many high spec technology features to help the driver. The campervan comes with ‘Adaptive ESP’ which is an electronic stability program which intervenes in some dangerous driving situations for example if your vehicle is at risk of skidding. This technology combines anti-lock breaking (ABS, break assist (BAS), acceleration skid control (ASR), electronic break force distribution (EBD) and you can have the choice whether to include the start-off assist system (AAS).

Other safety features included are the adaptive break lights, break assist, parking aid, trailer stabilisation, tyre-pressure monitoring system and the usual airbags and seatbelts. The campervan also boasts a high tech safety body which has a very strong passenger cell. This means there are certain areas of the structure that have energy-absorbing deformation zones to keep all passengers as safe as possible in the event of an accident.

There is a choice between the CDI 2.0 BlueEFFICIENCY and the CDI 2.2 BlueEFFICIENCY models. The 161bhp 220 CDR is capable of doing 47mpg and only emits 158g/km or CO2. With its four-cylinder turbo diesel engine the camper-van is very powerful and it ranges from 134bhp to 188bhp. Both models meet Euro 5Gr lll emissions standards and boast low fuel consumption along with low exhaust emissions and an exceptionally smooth drive. Both models are fitted with a diesel engine and a diesel particulate filter which is ‘a device designed to remove diesel particulate matter or soot from the exhaust gas of a diesel engine.’

The campervan went on sale in Germany in late July 2014 and is slowly but surely being bought to the UK. The sale date has not been confirmed but it will only be released if there is enough interest and the price will be likely to start at just above £45, 000.

Photo by Ray Forster / CC BY-ND 2.0